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Oxford Learning Launches Summer Reading Book Report Challenge to Encourage Reading and Writing this Summer

Oxford Learning Launches Summer Reading Book Report Challenge to Encourage Reading and Writing this Summer

  Canadian Parents Missing the Mark on Summer Learning

Oxford Learning Launches Summer Reading Book Report Challenge to encourage Reading and Writing this Summer

 A national survey conducted by Léger Marketing for Oxford Learning, Canada’s leading provider of supplemental education, shows that almost 65% of Canadian parents do not include any learning activities in their family’s summer plans.

“The results of this survey reinforce that when it comes to summer learning, parents are not thinking long term — they are not considering what a summer without learning means to their child’s academic performance next year, and that’s a big problem,” says Dr. Nick Whitehead, president of Oxford Learning. “Summer is a critical time for students. When they don’t maintain their academic momentum over the summer months, they fall behind, and quite often, they don’t catch up again.”

That national survey also reveals that when Canadian parents were asked to rank which summer activities were the most important, academic work was not a priority.

# 1 Spending time with family (36%)

# 2 Relaxing (13%)

# 3 Socializing (13%)

# 4 Summer Camps (12%)

# 5 Travelling (11%)

# 6 Exercise (8%)

# 7 Reading and Learning Activities (4%)

According to the education experts at Oxford Learning, if there is one thing that parents can do to help their children get better grades next fall, it’s making sure they are reading this summer. “Reading is the simplest and most accessible summer activity that all families can engage in together,” says Dr. Whitehead. “Not only is it a great way to spend time together as a family, it’s the perfect way to stay sharp this summer and get ready for next year.”

 

According to the survey results, Canadian parents listed family time as their number one summer activity. “We can’t think of a better way to spend quality family time this summer than reading a book together,” says Dr. Whitehead. “Not only does it bring the family together in a common purpose, it keeps the mind sharp and helps avoid the summer learning brain drain that is too common.”

For the Love of Reading — The Summer Reading Challenge!

To empower and reward children for continuing to read over the summer break, Oxford Learning is launching the first annual Summer Reading Book Report Challenge.

“Strong reading skills are the foundation for all learning, both inside and outside the classroom,” says Dr. Whitehead. “We want to encourage all Canadian students to read—and write—this summer and we hope that our Book Report Challenge will motivate families to place an emphasis on reading this summer.”

All Canadian children in grades 1-12 are invited to read one of the books listed in the Summer Reading Book Report Challenge (below and attached) and submit a brief (no more than 250 words) book report online. Entries will be accepted through the website oxfordlearning.com/summerreading. Visit the webpage for contest rules and regulations.

Grades 1-5

The Velveteen Rabbit, by Margery Williams

Miss Nelson is Missing!, by Harry Allard

The Adventures of Captain Underpants, by Dav Pilkey

Grades 6–8

Bridge to Terabithia, by Katherine Paterson

A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle

Holes, by Louis Sachar

Grades 9-12

Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card

Tuesdays with Morrie, by Mitch Albom

The Help, by Kathryn Stockett

French

Doug l’aventurier chez les gorilles, by Marie-Nicole Marchand

En mai, fais ce qu’il te plait, by André Marois

Les Exploits d’un héros réticent (mais extrêmement séduisant), by Maureen Fergus

 

The challenge is open to all Canadian students in Grades 1 – 12 and judges will select 4 entries (one in each category) to win a $100 Chapters Gift Card.  The Grand Prize winner will receive an iPad mini.

Tips for Parents: How to Prevent the Summer Slide for Your Child

Parents can take an active role in helping students prevent the academic summer slide by encouraging them practice reading and writing every day.  What can you do to keep your child’s brain active this summer? Here are some tips from Oxford Learning’s educational experts:

  • Encourage your children to keep reading! Reading continually improves comprehension skills and develops vocabulary.  Get kids their own library card and go to the library every weekend so they can pick their own reading material or give them a digital literacy boost with e-Readers for kids!
  • Summer movies can also help reel in unwilling readers.  A summer release may draw children into reading the accompanying book series.
  • Give your child a journal or scrapbook and encourage them to write. Tech savvy kids can create and update their own blog.
  • Limit screen time. Balance media consumption with reading time. Books are recreation as much as video games, surfing the Internet, or watching TV.  Variety and balance is key!
  • Play games such as Sudoku or crossword puzzles.  Any game with strategy and planning is great to keep the mind working. Find ways to challenge children’s minds!
  • Enrol your child in a class at Oxford Learning.  With more than 120 locations across Canada and programs suitable for children from preschool to high school, Oxford Learning Summer Programs help ensure that students of all ages spend time exploring, discovering, creating and learning.

“Oxford Learning’s summer programs ensure that your child’s break from school is not a break from learning,” says Dr. Whitehead.  “Learning is a part of life, not just a part of school.  By attending our summer learning programs, students head back to school informed, motivated, and ready to hit the ground running.”

About Oxford Learning

Established in 1984, Oxford Learning has grown to include more than 120 learning centres across Canada and the United States.  Oxford Learning goes beyond tutoring to help students reach their learning potential, not just for one grade or one year, but for a lifetime.  Oxford Learning’s unique programs teach children to learn how to learn.  Just a few hours a week can make a world of difference in developing the right skills and habits to succeed. No matter what the subject or grade level, Oxford Learning breaks the cycle of hiring tutors year after year.  Oxford Learning’s proprietary Dynamic Diagnostic Assessment™ allows Oxford Learning staff to get to know each child, from academic standing to skill gaps and learning potential.  With the goal of improved grades, motivation, and confidence for any child, Oxford Learning offers four main programs: Little Readers®, for children ages 3 to 6; Beyond Tutoring® for those in grades 1 to 8; Advantage High School Success™ for kids in grades 9 to 12, and En Français™ for students in grades 1-12.

 

Check out Oxford Learning at oxfordlearning.com or call your local Oxford Learning centre for more details.

Follow on Facebook www.facebook.com/oxfordlearning

Follow Oxford Learning and #DailyLearningTip @oxfordlearning.

 

Bullying

Bullying

This happens everywhere at any time in malls, at school, but us digital natives have moved up one step into not only being bully, being CYBER bully’s. So confident to write something about someone but your hiding. Hiding behind a screen. its easy to type and enter but hard to admit and retake those words. So before going and writing what you think have a little empathy and how you would feel if you felt uncomfortable about yourself and feeling like everyone hates you are stronger than that. SO STOP THE BULLYING. <3

Build Your Scholarship (Calling TAYLOR SWIFT FANS)

Build Your Scholarship (Calling TAYLOR SWIFT FANS)

For those of you in Grade 12 and post-secondary school, you are aware of how much work and energy you must dedicate to finding scholarships. With the school load and time spent searching for these scholarships; all you want to do is relax. Because at this moment, you’ve only found two scholarships; one which requires a reflection or an essay and the other is your guaranteed entrance scholarship.

I’m here to relieve the stress you experience while looking for scholarships and to make it a whole lot easier!

  1. University/College Website -The post-secondary school you are thinking of/are attending will have a page dedicated to scholarships/awards given yearly. This page will most likely include external awards that have been sponsored by alumni and prominent institutions. Some people are not aware that your school has a page dedicated to scholarships, let alone an abundance of scholarships therefore they don’t apply. They exist, USE THEM!
  2. Student Awards (http://studentawards.com) -This website is like a database. It provides you with a list of scholarships catered to your program and school. The scholarships listed on this website range from both internal and external sources. It’s a good place to begin when looking for scholarships.
  3. Student Life Network -Are you Canada’s luckiest student? Do you want to win a $20,000 scholarship? You can apply here: http://goo.gl/iKVsO. Unlike other scholarships, The Student Life Network aims at things that interest us today. Besides the scholarship, they are currently holding contest such as: A Meet and Greet with Taylor Swift in Vancouver, A Much Music Video Dance for your High School and a $5000 Mexx Shopping Spree. So if you’re interested, ENTER NOW! (You must be 13 years and older to enter this scholarship)
If any of these options apply to you, start APPLYING today! Don’t wait until the day before the scholarship deadline or start looking for scholarships during a stressful period, get AHEAD not STRESSED!

For the Grads of 2012, and All Future Grads!

For the Grads of 2012, and All Future Grads!

Hi, I am Gina Omilon! I am 18 years old and have just graduated from high school! I am currently Miss Teen Red Deer-World 2012 and my platform is Confidence through Education so I am writing a congratulatory post for all of the 2012 grads this year! Graduation is definitely one of the most exciting nights of your life and I cannot wait for mine! I would like to give some advice to those who are still attending high school and for those who have just wrapped up!

For Grade 9 to Grade 11, enjoy high school! I was that little girl always wishing to grow up, and now I wish I wasn’t “grown up.” Take in each school assembly, spirit day or pep rally. Remember all of those silly moments with friends and the hard ones too. Breathe in that horrible smell of the gym at least once, but never stand in the middle of the hallway during a class switch. Don’t just go from class to class, but try to get to know people along the way, especially your teachers! Teachers can be your best friend, and I know for me personally, many teachers were my best friend in high school! My performing arts teachers and science teachers were always there for me and helped me whenever I needed them. I always had a teacher I could go talk to, and know that they would keep everything confidential. Participate in school spirit days, even if you think it is lame. Most important, don’t spend your entire high school career trying to be “popular.” I know from experience that on the very last minute of your very last day, everyone instantly forgets who was “popular.” Popular is just a word that has a skewed meaning and it truly means nothing. If you have a great group of friends and are comfortable with who YOU are, then do not worry about anything else! Just enjoy your friends and the best 4 years of your life! 10 years after graduation you’ll be at your reunion and everyone will forget who was popular. They WILL remember who was nice, who was modest, had morals, and respected themselves and others. In short, value yourselves and others, don’t worry about popularity or who has the coolest clothes, be yourself, and don’t take any memories for granted! For the grade 11’s specifically, enjoy your senior year! It goes faster than any other year you have ever had! Trust me!

For the graduating Grade 12’s, wow! We made it this far! I know that I can’t give loads of advice because I am on the same page as you, but if there was anything I’d like for everyone to remember, it would be this: Never give up on your dreams. If you want something, go and get it. Work hard and do not quit. Don’t listen to anyone who says you “can’t!” I HATE that word. Anything is possible, and if you believe in yourself, it will be ten times easier! Do not go to college for something you do not want to be, or feel like you are being forced to be. Follow YOUR dreams and nobody else’s!  If you did not like the person you were in high school, that is fine! Whether or not you want to make amends, feel free to change! You don’t have to be that person forever! Be whoever you want to be now! Always try to become a better person and never settle for less than the best. Go out and explore the world; go overseas and see culture and architecture that is so very different from North America. Be spontaneous and adventurous, but still be smart and logical. Now that school is done, your horizon of opportunity has widened massively! There is so much you can do so don’t take advantage of that. Be optimistic, be positive and always see the good in everything that happens. Be strong and loyal to yourself. Don’t ever let anyone take advantage of you, but find forgiveness for them if they do. Let go of any high school grudges. I know this can be hard, even for me. I wasn’t popular in school, but always had a mean group of girls ready to make fun of anything I did. It’s still hard for me to talk about because it is really difficult to go to school every day and be yourself when you know someone is always laughing in the background. But I have forgiven them and have let go of it. We’re graduated now. We can’t hold onto grudges forever! In the very end, high school will be a mere dot on the chart of life. In short, just live everyday! Live! We are all so young and have so much time ahead of us. Let’s make the best of it. Congratulations for making it this far Graduates of 2012! You did it! We did it!

That is really all the advice I have. After 12 years of education (or 13 if we include kindergarten), I realize it was not the marks and grades that should have been my biggest worry. And, in grade 12 I figured that out. But for those who have not, I tell you from experience: Getting 90’s is GREAT! I will never argue that because even until my last day of school I was working hard in all of my classes to be at a 90% and I needed 90’s for university. But, if you do not do well on one test, don’t worry about it. In a year, that test will have been long forgotten! Also, never miss family functions to study! Each Halloween my family has a big get together and I missed studying for a major final the next day to hang out with my family. I did not do good on that final the next day AT ALL, but I do not remember my specific mark. I DO remember all the laughs and bonding time I had with my family though. So as important as the high grades are, make sure you have time to breathe and have fun within high school! It will make it much more enjoyable, trust me!

Grade 9 to 11; enjoy your last years in high school! I wish you all the luck in the future. To every single graduate, congratulations! You are only now beginning your life and I hope everything you ever want, comes to you. Show the world what the Class of 2012 is made of! Live everyday; Just live!

Summer Learning at Bottom of Parents’ List for Summer Activities

Summer Learning at Bottom of Parents’ List for Summer Activities

Summer Learning at Bottom of Parents’ List for Summer Activities

 Avoid Summer Brain Drain and Keep Children’s Brains Active with help and advice from the experts at Oxford Learning

While many families are excited for summer’s arrival and the break from school, experts warn that an absence of academic activities in the summer can be detrimental to students’ learning momentum.

A national survey recently conducted by Léger Marketing for Oxford Learning, Canada’s leader in supplementary education, reveals that academic work is the LEAST likely summer activity children will take part in this summer:

#1        Travel and/or family vacation (67%)
#2        Social and leisure time (64%)
#3        Activities and hobbies (60%)
#4        Camps and new experiences (37%)
#5        Academic work (13%)

“Summer learning loss is a huge problem as so many students lose hard-earned knowledge and learning skills over the summer break,” says Dr. Nick Whitehead, Co-founder and President, Oxford Learning. “Setting your child up for academic success can be as easy as dedicating a few hours a week to learning activities designed to reinforce vital reading and math skills.”

Parents Not Making the Grade in Helping to Keep Students Brains in Shape

Anyone involved in athletics knows that you can’t take three months off training and still be in top form, but rather you need to continually train to maintain optimal performance.  The brain is just like a muscle: if you don’t continually use it, you risk losing a significant amount of valuable learning, making it hard to gear back up for success.

When Canadian parents were asked which of the summer activities are most important—academic work was NOT a priority!

# 1         Activities and hobbies (95%)
# 2         Social and leisure time (95%)
# 3         Travel and/or family vacation (92%)
# 4         Camps and new experiences (76%)
# 5         Academic work (56%)

“Just like family vacation and summer camps that parents have scheduled for the summer months, you need to also develop a well-balanced plan that integrates these activities including your child’s education this summer,” says Dr. Whitehead.  “Parents can make this summer an opportunity to advance their children’s potential.  Keep summer learning simple, fun and stimulating with a little bit of academic preparation that will go a long way towards making the coming school year the best ever.”

 Tips for Parents: How to Prevent Summer Slide for Your Child

Parents can take an active role in helping students prevent the academic summer slide by encouraging them to observe and practice reading and math in day-to-day activities.  What can you do to keep your student’s brain active this summer? Here are some tips from Oxford Learning’s educational experts:

  • Encourage your children to keep reading! Reading continually improves comprehension skills and develops vocabulary.  Get kids their own library card and go to the library every weekend so they can pick their own reading material or give them a digital literacy boost with e-Readers for kids!
  • Summer movies can also help reel in unwilling readers.  A summer release may draw children into reading the book series.
  • Give your child a journal or scrapbook and encourage them to write. Tech savvy kids can create and update their own blog.
  • Add in a daily measure of math!  Calculate the road trip.  Plan the details for the family vacation such as determining the kilometres of the road trip, estimated time of arrival and the amount of gas required.  Compare prices at the grocery store or bake together and have your little chef do the measurements for each ingredient.
  • Limit screen time. Balance media consumption with reading time. Books are recreations as much as video games, surfing the Internet, or watching TV.  Variety and balance is key!
  • Play games such as Sudoku or crossword puzzles.  Any game with strategy and planning is great to keep the mind working. Find ways to challenge their mind!
  • Discuss things with your kids. If you watch a movie, talk about it.  If you go for a walk, talk about what you see. Conversation helps keep the mind active and engaged.
  • Enroll your child in a class at Oxford Learning.  With flexible schedules and lots of options, there’s something for everyone.

“Summer learning should not be separate from summer fun.  Daily activities can be enjoyable while still adding educational value to a student’s summer,” says Dr. Whitehead. “The secret to successful summer learning is knowing how to harness the learning opportunities that are happening all around us and turning them into valuable, useable summer learning that challenges the brain.”

Summer Learning that is Fun!

The experts at Oxford Learning—Canada’s leader in preparing children for lifelong success—have developed a unique and enjoyable approach to summer learning that will help children of all ages.

With more than 120 locations across Canada and programs suitable for children from preschool to high school, Oxford Learning Summer Camp Programs help ensure that students of all ages spend class time exploring, discovering, creating and learning. Summer programs give young students the opportunity to get used to the structure they will encounter in the classroom and high school students prepare for the fast-paced curriculum of a new grade level.

“Oxford Learning’s summer programs cover the academic areas where attention is needed, while developing the thinking and organizational skills that help students get ahead and stay ahead,” says Dr. Whitehead.  “Luckily, only a few hours a week can help prevent learning loss. Day or evening, once a week or every day, Oxford Learning’s Summer Camp Programs offer flexible hours that work with your child’s summer time schedule.”

About Oxford Learning

Established in 1984, Oxford Learning has grown to include more than 120 learning centres across Canada and the United States.  Oxford Learning goes beyond tutoring to help students reach their learning potential, not just for one grade or one year, but for a lifetime.  Oxford Learning’s unique programs teach children to learn how to learn.  Just a few hours a week can make a world of difference in developing the right skills and habits to succeed. No matter what the subject or grade level, Oxford Learning breaks the cycle of hiring tutors year after year.  Oxford Learning’s proprietary Dynamic Diagnostic Assessment™ allows Oxford Learning staff to get to know each child, from academic standing to skill gaps and learning potential.  With the goal of improved grades, motivation, and confidence for any child, Oxford Learning offers three core programs: Little Readers®, for children ages 3 to 6; Beyond Tutoring® for those in grades 1 to 8; Advantage High School Success™ for kids in grades 9 to 12.

Check out Oxford Learning at oxfordlearning.com or call your local Oxford Learning centre for more details.

Follow on Facebook www.facebook.com/oxfordlearning

Follow Oxford Learning and #DailyLearningTip @oxfordlearning.

** From May 14-17, 2012, Leger Marketing conducted an online survey among 445 randomly selected Canadians who have children aged 6-18 years old. The margin of error—which measures sampling variability—is +/-2.5%. The results have been statistically weighted according to the most current education, age, gender and region Census data to ensure samples are representative of the Canadian adult population.

Five Things I Learned in Grade 11

Although I’m not quite done my four years of high school (one more year to go!), I feel like I’ve learned enough to potentially make my senior year the best year yet. Most of what I’ve learned comes from a tough or stressful experience. Hopefully with my tips, some of you won’t have to experience the agony.

So, here’s what I’ve learned in the past school year…

1. People Come and Go

This is quite hard to accept, since popularity and large social groups are always a big deal. However it is true that you should keep your best friends close. A lot of people that you will meet will walk into your life, and then walk right back out (not necessarily in a negative way). If you’re going to depend on anyone, it should be your closest buds that understand you best. So don’t get caught up in people that aren’t there when you need them most, and don’t depend on someone that doesn’t know you well enough!

2. Education Comes First

You’ve all heard this enough- but there’s a reason for that! Once you hit junior year, all this talk about University and College will start among your peers. What’s important at this stage is that you take courses you love, and pay good attention to what you are taught. The main purpose of school is your education, and it should be taken quite seriously at this point.

3. Extra-curricular Activities Are Important!

You don’t need to join every club your school offers, but at least join one. Find something you like to do, and it doesn’t even need to be academic related at all. Do you like volleyball? How about drama? None of these appeal to you? Then start your own club! Remember that when you apply for college, extra-curricular activities will be your best friends.

4. Hard Work Pays Off

Keeping yourself motivated for ten months can be difficult, I know. What’s important to understand is that hard work and initiative will always pay off. If you put in a great amount of effort towards your classes, you might win an award! At the very least, you should be able to earn a grade that you’re satisfied with. Self satisfaction is equivalent to a certificate!

5. Don’t Waste Time

Most of us think that work happens after college. This is not true! The most successful people, are people that have exposed themselves to working when they were young. You’re not too young to gain experience in a career that you admire. If you want to be a doctor, then you could volunteer at hospitals! If you want to work with children, then get a summer job at a camp! The opportunities truly are endless, it just takes the right amount of research and motivation. So don’t waste time and get to work!

When I Study I…

When I study I listen to music, helps me block out any distractions. I always have a drink by my bed side too. And turning off the phone is also a good way tohelp focus.

No Longer a Freshman

No Longer a Freshman

I wrote my last final exam! I have my marks back and am happy to say have successfully completed my first year of a four-year commerce degree program at the Edwards School of Business in Saskatoon.

The prospect of starting a post-secondary education was intimidating but ultimately rewarding. There are many options and decisions, lots of assignments and exams. There is also opportunity to meet new people and endless possibilities.

Tips for First Year Success:

1. Explore the campus and find your classes before the first day of class.
2. Public transit may be your best option.
3. Second-hand textbooks are readily available from other students or at the campus bookstore.
4. Be open to new ideas and possibilities.
5. Work harder than you’ve ever worked before. You’ll have to do a
lot more than you did in high school to be successful.
6. Get involved in campus life; join clubs or sports and visit popular campus hangouts to meet new people.
7. Study groups are common and a great way to meet people.
8. Always attend class.
9. Learn to love coffee.
10. Get to know your professors.
11. Learn organizational skills.
12. Pay attention – You are paying a lot of money for university classes and are there to learn.

Edwards School of Business